Created on 22 November 2017
Idiom
Over the hill
Meaning
Being no longer young and unable to do what you once did. A humorous way of saying that someone is old, no longer attractive and energetic, or someone who can’t keep up with the young ones anymore.
Origin

Over the hill This saying dates back to the 1900s in England. It was once commonly believed that during the first 40 years of your life you climbed up a hill and once you reached the top, you were over the hill and the woeful descent began.

This idiomatic expression, therefore means that you are old, past your prime and past your best.

Now, with the 30s being the new 20s and the 40s being the new 30s, the top of the hill mark has somewhat shifted and has lost its value. That said, people still use this expression in a fun-loving or ironic way, when they want to tease someone who has reached an important milestone in life.

Examples
        • - Oh my, you’re turning 41! You’re definitely over the hill now. 😉

        • - I always thought that once you reached 40 you would be over the hill, but I don’t believe that this is true anymore.

        • - Mick Jagger is still going and jumping around like a lunatic on stage, despite being way over the hill.
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