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Idiom

Straight from the Horse’s Mouth: Origin and Meaning

Meaning
Directly from the original source, firsthand.
Origin
Carry coals to NewcastleIn horse racing gossip about which horse is likely to win circulates amongst people who bet.
The most trusted authorities are considered to be those in closest touch with the horses, trainers etc. The notional ‘from the horse’s mouth’ is supposed to indicate one step better than even that, the horse itself. Some people think that It might also because a horse’s age can be determined most precisely and directly by examining its teeth. Related to the phrase “long in the tooth”.
The earliest printed version I can find of it is from the USA and clearly indicates the horseracing context – in the Syracuse Herald, May 1913:

“I got a tip yesterday, and if it wasn’t straight from the horse’s mouth it was jolly well the next thing to it.”

Examples
– If you don’t believe me, go talk to him and hear it straight from the horse’s mouth. It’s true.
– Katie’s pregnant. I ​know it’s ​true, because I got it ​straight from the horse’s mouth – Katie told me herself.
– Are you sure she’s leaving?”Definitely, I heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.