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QUICK QUOTE

Idiom

See a Man About a Dog: Origin and Meaning

Meaning
If you do not want to tell someone the truth about where you are going or what you are doing, you can say, “I’m going to see a man about a dog”. Often used when you need to go to the toilet or to buy an alcoholic drink.
Origin
see a man about a dogThis idiom was first used in the play “The Flying Scud” written by Dion Boucicault in 1866. One of the characters tries to get out of a difficult situation by saying, “Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can’t stop; I’ve got to see a man about a dog”.
Examples
“I’m just going to see a man about a dog. I’ll be back soon.”

“I’m sorry but I have to go now. I need to see a man about a dog.”

John: “Hey, where are you going Paul? I wanted to talk to you about work.”
Paul: “I, errr… I have to see a man about a dog.”
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