Idiom
Take the bull by the horns
Meaning
To deal with a difficult situation with determination and bravery. This idiom is usually used when someone has been postponing an action for some time and finally wants or needs to resolve it.
Take the bull by the horns
Origin
Experts disagree about the exact origin of the phrase. One theory is that it originated in the American West where ranchers, in order to control a bull, would have to catch it. Grabbing a bull by the legs or the neck would not have worked. The only way was to face the problem head on by taking the bull by the horns and bringing it to the ground.
Examples
“After five years with the company, John decided to take the bull by the horns and ask his boss for a raise.”

“Pete has been engaged to Maxine for long time now and I know he loves her. He should take the bull by the horns and ask her to marry him.”

“The Government has been avoiding the issue for too long. It needs to take the bull by the horns and tackle immigration.”

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