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(To) take the words right out of my mouth

Idiom
(To) take the words right out of my mouth
Meaning
When someone has said exactly what you were thinking. It's usually when you want to show someone that you really agree with them or to show that you had the same idea as them. It's always a very positive response to someone's opinion or idea.
Origin

(To) take the words right out of my mouth

There isn't any clear origin but it was first seen written in 1574. A much more recent example is a song by popular singer Meatloaf titled You Took the Words Right Out of My Mouth (1977)
Examples

“You took the words right out of my mouth—I think she looks gorgeous, too!”


A: ‘The speed limit on motorways should be raised.’

B: ‘I agree completely! You’ve taken the words right out of my mouth!’

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