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How to Say “Hello” and “Goodbye” in English

Hello and Goodbye!

The first time you meet someone it’s polite to greet them. The way you greet someone depends on the situation and the relationship you have with the person. There are two types of greetings for Hello and Goodbye in English: formal and informal, and we will be looking at them in detail.

Greetings

Goodbyes

Sentence Response Sentence Response

How do you do?

I’m doing well, thank you, and you?

How do you do?

 

It was nice meeting you.

 

 

 Nice meeting you, too.

 

 

Hello, pleased to meet you.

Pleased to meet you, too.

 

 

It was a pleasure to meet you.

 

Pleasure to meet you, too.

 

Good Morning,

Good Afternoon,

Good Evening

Morning,

Afternoon,

Evening,

 

Have a good day.

 

 

Thank you. You too.

 

 

HOW DO YOU DO?
The MOST formal greeting in English is “how do you do?”. This greeting is used most frequently in the workplace, or to show respect towards somebody who is older or more important than you. The most obvious response to this greeting would be “I’m doing well, thank you, and you? ”, however, most people just repeat “How do you do?” right back, and it is perfectly acceptable to do so.

Giving a handshake at school

A: How do you do?
B: How do you do?

HELLO, PLEASED TO MEET YOU.
Another variation of this greeting is “Hello, nice to meet you”. This is a polite way of introducing yourself and is often followed by “Pleased/Nice to meet you, too”.

GOOD MORNING, GOOD AFTERNOON, OR GOOD EVENING
Greeting someone according to the time of day is another popular form of greeting. Please be aware that Goodnight is never used, unless you are saying “goodbye” to someone after an evening meal, drinks or event. If you are meeting someone at 9pm before a meal or an event, remember to use “Good evening”. A more informal way of using these types of greetings is to shorten them and simply say “Morning”, “Afternoon” and “Evening”. The best way to reply is to repeat the greeting back.

Informal Sentences:

Greetings Goodbyes
Sentence Response Sentence Response
Hello.

Hi.

Hiya.

Hello.

Hi.

Nice meeting you.

Take it easy.

Have a good day

You too, bye
How are you? I’m fine, and you?

All right, and you?

Ok, see you soon.

See ya.

Bye.
How’s things? Pretty good. How/What about you? Take care. You too, bye.
How’s it going, (mate)? OK.

Not bad.

How/What about you? I’m off. OK, bye.
How’re you doing?

How’s life?

Hello, how are things with you?

Very well. Pretty good.

Not Bad.

How/What about you?  

I’ve got to go.

See ya.

Bye for now.

See you later.

Bye.

What’s up? Nothing much, and you?

Nothing special, and you?

 

So long

See you later.

Catch you later.

See you soon, bye
What’s new? Not much. I’m good.
All right, mate?

All right!

Yep, pretty good

Yep, hunky dory.

Hiya!

Have a good one. You too.

HELLO
Hello is the easiest and most popular way of greeting someone in social or semi-social occasions or even in some relaxed workplaces. This is often abbreviated to Hi or Hiya! Hiya is an abbreviation of ‘How are you?’ but in most cases there is no need to say ‘How you are’ and all you need to do is repeat Hiya back.Words hello

THE HOW QUESTIONS:
All the How questions are pretty informal and are usually used to greet somebody you know or have met before. In response it is polite to show an interest in the person and to follow your reply with “what/how about you?” or something similar.

THE WHAT QUESTIONS
The degree of formality in What questions is very low as the relationship between the speakers is well-established. You probably know what they have been up to, hence the answer, “nothing much.” The respective goodbye response in such situations in the UK are Catch you later and a Have a good one (a cool way of saying have a good day!).

ALL RIGHT, MATE?
(often pronounced “y’rite”)

This greeting is British through and through and literally means “are you all right, my friend?” Nowadays, it simply means ‘Hello, how are you?’ between close friends and family. The informality transpires in the answer as well (Yep, and you?/ Yep, hunky dory/ Yep, hiya!).

Time to Say Goodbye Text written on notebook page

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