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Top 3 favourite Christmas idioms and how to use them

87646008It’s the most wonderful time of the year…

If you recognize the quote then you’re well into the season’s spirit! Ladies and gentlemen, it is with great joy that I would like to officially announce;

Christmas is here!

For those of us living in London (and surely other big cities around the world) we have inevitably come across late night party animals with reindeer ears on, Christmas carols (in pretty much every single shop) on the high street and of course mulled wine in the overcrowded Disneyland for grown-ups – Winter Wonderland.

So, it should come as no surprise to anyone that this article is dedicated to Christmas. To be more precise, we’ll be looking at my Top 3 favourite Christmas idioms.

525355827So here it goes:

Cold turkey = Unfortunately, it has nothing to do with eating leftovers from Christmas dinner. However, the idiom is used to describe a sudden and complete abandonment of an addictive substance i.e. smoking.

Even though she was a heavy smoker she decided to give it up cold turkey. When I asked her why the sudden change, she said she found out it easier to quit then and there than gradually cut back.

 

Christmas comes but once a year = We are well aware that Christmas Day is on the 25th December, however this idiom is used to justify over indulgence. Whether it’s eating far too much, excessive alcohol consumption or shopping therapy, everything goes (=is ok) on the basis that it doesn’t happen often.
– I’m not getting paid for another two weeks. I’ll be absolutely broke if I buy those boots.

– Yes, but there’re 50% off and you really like them. I’d think about it if I were you!

– Oh…ok then! You’ve convinced me. After all, Christmas comes but once a year.

 

Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth = It pains me to say that this but unfortunately you’re not getting a pony for Christmas (although some of you just might). This idiom is used to express that we should not be ungrateful when we receive a present, even if it’s not exactly what we wanted.

I got a box of Cherry Liqueur Chocolates for Christmas… Really? I don’t even like Cherry. He could’ve gone with plain old orange ones.

– Hey… Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth. He was nice enough to get you something in the first place.

 So there it is. My three all time favourite Christmas inspired idioms. The great thing about them is that even though they are inspired by this over joyous festivity, you can use them year-round in various different situations. So know you know what to tell a friend when there are being somewhat picky about a present!

Enjoy your holidays and may the season’s kind spirits warm your hearts!

Activity: Which are your favourite idioms? Go online, do some research and let us know all about them!

 

Have a lovely weekend!

Bloomsbury International

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